welcome

Well guys. I got trendy and made a yarn wreath. I’ve been seeing them all over for a while now and decided to take a stab at it myself. My former wreath was… a bit of an embarrassment. It was nice when I first purchased it… sort of woven together with vines and tiny autumnal flower accents. However, every time someone walked through the door, it would fall off. The tiny flowers soon became no more. It became far more of a nuisance than anything. So I had to set my sights on something different.

I admit… I resisted the yarn wreath because of the trendiness factor. What can I say? I can be too cool for school sometimes. But I sorted out my priorities and realized how much more important it is to have a wreath that welcomes people, rather than sticks to their purses or sweaters and falls off the door every time.

So here is my new wreath:

Here is the bow at the top:

And here it is hanging on my janky apartment door:

Excuse the ugly flash but the janky apartment hallway also has janky apartment lighting…

Anyway. That is my new wreath. I hope that it helps people to feel welcome. And happy. And greeted. Come visit me and test it out!

 

love in a box

Greetings! Today, I am going to share a shadow box with all of you. I made this box for my brother and his lovely new bride, Melinda.

Their wedding was absolutely gorgeous!! For their gift, I wanted to make a shadowbox that was not only pretty to look at… but had significance to their day!

So. Here is how you make a Shadow Box.
Step 1: Purchase a Shadow Box. Mine looked like this:

I bought it from hobbs lobbs. I liked it because it looks like barnwood, which was, of course, a big part of this wedding.

Step 2: Create a backdrop. I used layer of weathered-wood printed paper, decorated with Rifle Paper floral accents (I scanned a journal, which was also part of the bridesmaid gift!) which as you might recall from this post was a big inspiration for the invites, etc. I overlaid the wood with swiss dot fabric from Melinda’s dress.

When creating a backdrop, think about mixing textures and patterns. Here’s mine:

up close detail

Step 3: Arrange, arrange and re-arrange. Take the elements and place them all over. Switch things out. Try again. I probably had this arranged 7 different ways, with different pieces that I ended up not using.
The best time to decide to make a shadow box is before the actual wedding. This way, you can take any items that you might be able to use (i.e. programs, or even table decorations once the wedding is over.) You will also be able to pay more careful attention to the ceremony (is there a verse you can use? a quote?) and the decor (can you replicate something on a smaller scale?) to have the most custom box you can create.

Here is a closer look at some of the details:

Inspiration pieces:
Gorgeous weathered barn.
Swiss Dot lace from the dress.
Clothespin details.
Wooden Signs.
A beautiful ceremony performed by Zac’s friend Reynolds.
Chalkboards.

A word of advice on adhesives:

Shadow boxes are created with multiple mediums. Different materials require different adhesives. For papers, use mod podge. Classic mod podge can wrinkle, so I recommend spray adhesive for a flat finish. I would not recommend glossy. A glue gun is ideal for heavier items, like the metal key and glass vase. If you were gluing wooden pieces, use wood glue. Proper adhesives ensure that your shadow box won’t fall apart upon arrival.

Anyway, there you have it: a shadow box tutorial. They’re all created differently and make a totally unique gift. If you have any questions about anything I made specifically, just ask!

Good luck and happy crafting!

long overdue…

Dear friends and readers,
Hello! I’m back!
I apologize for the unforgivably lengthy hiatus on this poor blog. I suppose I can sort it blame it on Tucker.

Yes, that’s right! We are now proud puppy parents and this our darling little boy. He is just over 3 months old and we’ve had him for about a month. He’s fabulous and we love him. However, I will never downplay the amount of work a new puppy requires! Here he is having his first bath.

Anyway, enough about the pup and on to craftier things!
While I’ve been gone, I’ve still been working on a project or two! Here is a gift I made for my friends for our trip to D.C. (which was fabulous of course).

I bought some little metal jewelry pieces from the hobs lobs for a buck thirty-four for a two-pack! Unbelievable! There were varying sizes, but I chose the 12mm to start because I think that small things are cute. So basically these little metal pieces have a pushed in center that is ready to be decorated with whatever you find and like the look of!

The cardboard that the piece came attached to had an “actual size” square printed on it, which served as a perfect template. I traced the template onto the background patterned paper. Then I cut teeny animals out of an old anthro catalog I had lying around. Using Mod Podge, Dimensional magic, I glued the animal to the background, initial stamped it and then pasted it into the metal piece. I filled in the rest with more dimensional magic, which looks cloudy while its drying.**Note: if you have bubbles in the glue, use a toothpick to drag them to the edge and then pop them.

This one actually had a small bubble, but since its above the mouth of the fish, I still thought it was slightly appropriate! I put a pearl on this one using my jewelry making tools. I think these square ones can also be turned sideways to make a bracelet. I prefer the necklaces myself, but there’s always room to experiment.

  If you want to try this at home, you’ll need:
Jewelry pieces found at hobs lobs
Old magazines or any sort of miniature pictures
Alphabet stamps, or even chopped up letters from magazines
Mod Podge Dimensional Magic
A little imagination!

All in all, I really liked the way these turned out, and proceeded to make quite a few more in different styles. I’m still trying to find a way to print high resolution animal pictures on such a teeny scale, but it’s proving to be difficult with my resources thus far. If you find a way, don’t hesitate to share with the rest of us!

I will take this moment to say I am rededicating myself to this blog and there will not be such a long wait for more splendid things in the future! I’m sorry and I love you all.

Happy crafting!

monograms and buttons, oh my!

Our couch is massive. It sleeps 4… comfortably. So naturally, we have a serious need for throw pillows. I saw a cute idea I liked for a monogrammed pillow and thought, why not do it with buttons? I have a pretty substantial button collection that was passed down to me, so I already had most of the supplies at home.
I bought a pillow from Meijer. I totes dig the Katie Brown collection so I often check out the home goods section. I found a pillow I liked and traced a lower case g on it with a sharpie. If you are not a good free-hander, perhaps you should try chalk. I laid the buttons out and pinned a few down. A little rearranging was necessary to get a good shape.
Note: it will save time if you do not hot-glue the buttons to the pillow. It will be quick, but the buttons will fall off and you’ll just have to sew them on anyway… fail.

At this point, I just sewed the buttons on, one at a time. I did need to rip a hole in the seam to fit my hand inside the pillow, which I stitched back up when I was done. It might be easier to start with a pillow that zips.

It might be cute to try this idea with something other than a letter… geometric shapes? an animal? Or maybe it would be cute to try multi-colored buttons as well?

I think the end result is sort of cottage-y chic.

If you want to make this at home, you’ll need:
1 pillow, either one you’ve sewn or store bought
Buttons
Thread
Needle

Sharpie or chalk

I hope you learn from my mistake on this one and don’t waste time gluing, because you’ll also waste time peeling all of the glue off of the buttons before you can sew them back on. If your pillows are as well-used as ours, you’ll need them to be sturdy!

Happy sewing!