b & e

Quite recently, two of my most favorite friends, B Head and Feick, were married. Their wedding was so so gorgeous at the historic Bowens Mills Farm in Michigan. B’s favorite color is olive green, which she decided to mix with peach for the wedding. And it was beautiful. Every aspect.

 

 

 

 

 

I had the sincere privilege of designing their invitations. After quite a few designs and plenty of inspiration, we came up with this:

The RSVP postcards turned outl like this:

B ended up printing the invites on a shinier paper… which turned out beautifully. She also used a punch on the edges for a little bit of extra pizzazz. Here’s how it all looked in person:

I hope I can share more of this wedding with you all in the future… it really was breathtaking and so meaningful for all of the friends and family there.

Happy Wednesday, all!

welcome

Well guys. I got trendy and made a yarn wreath. I’ve been seeing them all over for a while now and decided to take a stab at it myself. My former wreath was… a bit of an embarrassment. It was nice when I first purchased it… sort of woven together with vines and tiny autumnal flower accents. However, every time someone walked through the door, it would fall off. The tiny flowers soon became no more. It became far more of a nuisance than anything. So I had to set my sights on something different.

I admit… I resisted the yarn wreath because of the trendiness factor. What can I say? I can be too cool for school sometimes. But I sorted out my priorities and realized how much more important it is to have a wreath that welcomes people, rather than sticks to their purses or sweaters and falls off the door every time.

So here is my new wreath:

Here is the bow at the top:

And here it is hanging on my janky apartment door:

Excuse the ugly flash but the janky apartment hallway also has janky apartment lighting…

Anyway. That is my new wreath. I hope that it helps people to feel welcome. And happy. And greeted. Come visit me and test it out!

 

love in a box

Greetings! Today, I am going to share a shadow box with all of you. I made this box for my brother and his lovely new bride, Melinda.

Their wedding was absolutely gorgeous!! For their gift, I wanted to make a shadowbox that was not only pretty to look at… but had significance to their day!

So. Here is how you make a Shadow Box.
Step 1: Purchase a Shadow Box. Mine looked like this:

I bought it from hobbs lobbs. I liked it because it looks like barnwood, which was, of course, a big part of this wedding.

Step 2: Create a backdrop. I used layer of weathered-wood printed paper, decorated with Rifle Paper floral accents (I scanned a journal, which was also part of the bridesmaid gift!) which as you might recall from this post was a big inspiration for the invites, etc. I overlaid the wood with swiss dot fabric from Melinda’s dress.

When creating a backdrop, think about mixing textures and patterns. Here’s mine:

up close detail

Step 3: Arrange, arrange and re-arrange. Take the elements and place them all over. Switch things out. Try again. I probably had this arranged 7 different ways, with different pieces that I ended up not using.
The best time to decide to make a shadow box is before the actual wedding. This way, you can take any items that you might be able to use (i.e. programs, or even table decorations once the wedding is over.) You will also be able to pay more careful attention to the ceremony (is there a verse you can use? a quote?) and the decor (can you replicate something on a smaller scale?) to have the most custom box you can create.

Here is a closer look at some of the details:

Inspiration pieces:
Gorgeous weathered barn.
Swiss Dot lace from the dress.
Clothespin details.
Wooden Signs.
A beautiful ceremony performed by Zac’s friend Reynolds.
Chalkboards.

A word of advice on adhesives:

Shadow boxes are created with multiple mediums. Different materials require different adhesives. For papers, use mod podge. Classic mod podge can wrinkle, so I recommend spray adhesive for a flat finish. I would not recommend glossy. A glue gun is ideal for heavier items, like the metal key and glass vase. If you were gluing wooden pieces, use wood glue. Proper adhesives ensure that your shadow box won’t fall apart upon arrival.

Anyway, there you have it: a shadow box tutorial. They’re all created differently and make a totally unique gift. If you have any questions about anything I made specifically, just ask!

Good luck and happy crafting!

m & z

A few months ago, my brother, Zac, married my friend, Melinda. Even though I was very annoyed at him for having stolen my friend when they first started up years ago, things really couldn’t have worked out better for me because my friend is now my sister-in-law and is stuck with me forever! yaaaaayyyyyy!

Anyway, as I love weddings, I ended up partaking quite a bit in the planning and designing of this absolutely gorgeous wedding. Someday, I’ll share some of the photos. In the mean time, I’ll show you the invitations I created for them (Zac also contributed quite a bit).

Disclaimer: I am not an artist. I am not a graphic designer. However, I do <3 art and graphic design. So I try. I make mistakes. I work around tools I don’t understand. And sometimes, cool stuff comes out of it.

For Zac and Melinda’s wedding, I was really inspired by Rifle Paper Co. which used to be sort of an obscure, Once Wed secret, but now is blowing up and can now be found at Anthropologie and all over Pinterest. Anyway, I love the rich botanicals of Rifle, and the almost cartoonish quality of their simplified art. So without ripping off their art too much, I set off to paint something similar. This is what turned out:

And, of course, the RSVP card:

This was the first time I physically painted something and tried to turn it into print. I would say it was mostly successful as a small amount of the detail was lost in the scanning process. All in all, it turned out pretty splendid, all things considered.

Stay tuned for more invites and designs!

chiffon flowers

Welcome to the flowery goodness how-to! 
 

Fabric flowers are everywhere and that is because they are so darn cute. Whether you put them on a hair clip, headband or tank, they seem to automatically spruce up any outfit with their garden party charm. There are plenty of ways to make flowers, but I’m going to include instructions for what I consider to be the easiest! 
You can use any variety of materials for these, from standard cotton to chiffon to thick silk dupioni. I used chiffon this time, because I think that the flimsier fabrics add a bit of whimsy and character to the flowers.

 Find a perfect circle (a lid of any variety will work just fine) and use that as a tracing pattern. I usually fold my material in half and cut through 2 layers at once. You’ll want to put a straight pin through the pieces of material so they don’t slip and slide whilst you cut!
Cut a number of circles in the fabric (the amount varies based on how the petals expand/how full the petals ought to look). You will use one circle as the base for your flower.

Lay one circle down flat. Take another and fold it into quarters. Put a drop of hot glue in at the point and glue the folded chiffon to the center of the circle. Glue another folded chiffon quarter next to the first, and so on until you have four petals. 

Repeat this process again, staggering the petals slightly. 

 Once your flower is looking full and fluffy, take one more circle and fold it into eighths. Put hot glue in the corner of the fold and stick it in the center. This should, hopefully, complete the look of a full flower.
A note of caution: please be careful using hot glue with chiffon. The fabric is very thin and you can pretty easily burn your hand pressing the petals in. I suggest using a low intensity hot glue gun.

If you want to make this at home, you’ll need:
fabric (very little is needed to make just one flower, so a half yard makes quite a few)
fabric scissors (any sharp scissor should work- just remember the duller the scissor the more fraying! uneven cutting will definitely show on these)
hot glue sticks and a hot glue gun
fray check/ no sew glue if you concerned about the edges fraying
Variations: 
Instead of cutting circles, cut a 5-petal flowered shape
Try using 2 different colors, incorporating circles of both into the flower
Use buttons or beads for center decorations
The sky is the limit! Be creative!